Michael Buerk

Michael Buerk

 

The 11-night ‘Royal India’ journey from Delhi to Mumbai, departing the UK on  14th February, 2010 and including 6 nights aboard the Maharajas’ Express, will be accompanied by the multi-award winning journalist and broadcaster, Michael Buerk, who will give a series of talks en route.

 Michael Buerk has probably won more international awards for television reporting than any other British journalist, most notably for his coverage of the Ethiopian famine for BBC News in 1984/5, which alerted the world to the extent of the tragedy and inspired the Band Aid and Live Aid fundraising efforts of Bob Geldof. He was named “Television Journalist of the Year” by the Royal Television Society in 1984 and won a second RTS award that year for foreign reporting. He has won the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) award for factual broadcasting. He has been awarded the “Golden Nymph” at the Monte Carlo Film and Television Festival, Europe’s premier prize for television journalism, and the United States “National Headliner” and “George Polk” awards, two of the three most important honours there are for broadcasters. Michael has reported for BBC TV News in various roles since 1973. He also presented BBC Television’s flagship news programme, The Ten O’clock News. He is chairman of the BBC’s discussion programme on moral and ethical issues The Moral Maze (BBC Radio 4).

Sir Mark Tully

Sir Mark Tully

 

The 11-night ‘Celestial India’ journey from Calcutta to Delhi,  20th March, 2010  and including 7 nights aboard the Maharajas’ Express, will be accompanied by distinguished writer and broadcaster, Sir Mark Tully, who will offer his expert insights on Indian history and culture during a series of talks en route.

Sir Mark Tully (born in Calcutta, India in 1935) was the Chief of Bureau, BBC, New Delhi for 22 years. The son of an accountant, he was brought up by a strict European nanny in Calcutta and did not come to Britain until he was ten. He was educated at Marlborough College and at Trinity Hall, Cambridge University, where he read History and Theology. He joined the BBC and quickly became India Correspondent in 1964. Whether it was dodging the bullets on the India-Pakistan border, describing the poverty of Calcutta’s street beggars or detailing the horrific aftermath of the Bhopal chemical disaster, he gave a unique insight into the life of the subcontinent. Sir Mark left the BBC in 1997 and now, still based in Delhi, he works as a freelance writer and broadcaster. His books include No Full Stops in India, Heart of India, India in Slow Motion and India’s Unending Journey. He was made an Officer of The Order of the British Empire in 1985 and was awarded the Padma Shree in 1992, a rare distinction for a non-Indian. He was knighted in the 2002 New Year Honours.

 

 

 

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